Category Archives: Women’s Health

Spring into Seasonal Fruit and Vegetables

It is hard to believe that spring is here (literally). With the start of a new season means different fruits and vegetables are in season as well. As far as fruits and vegetables go, spring is considered to be March, April and May. When a fruit or vegetable is in season it means is at its peak of flavor or harvest. Not only will the flavor be optimal the price will be the cheapest. Next time you head out to the grocery store be sure to try some of the following items that are in season right now!

strawberriessnow peasmango

Remember, you can enjoy the taste of any fruit or vegetable year-round by using fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and 100% juice – it all counts!

Apricots 
Artichokes 
Asparagus 
Barbados Cherries
Belgian Endive
Bitter Melon
Broccoli
Butter Lettuce
Cactus
Chayote Squash 
Cherimoya
Chives
Collard Greens
Corn
Fava Beans
Fennel
Fiddlehead Ferns
Green Beans
Honeydew
Jackfruit
Limes
Lychee 
Mango
Manoa Lettuce
Morel Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Oranges 
Pea Pods
Peas
Pineapple
Purple Asparagus
Radicchio
Ramps
Red Leaf Lettuce
Rhubarb 
Snow Peas
Sorrel
Spinach
Spring Baby Lettuce
Strawberries
Swiss Chard
Vidalia Onions
Watercress
White Asparagus
 
limesartichokeswiss chardpineapple

Reference: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.com

 

Drunkorexia

Drunkorexia is a fairly new phenomenon where an individual limits daily calorie intake in order to be able to “drink” their calories.  Usually, this is done in an effort to drink alcohol without gaining weight. There are multiple risks associated with drunkorexia.  Drinking on an empty stomach will get you drunk faster, but this in turn reduces self-control and can lead to a night of making bad decisions.  Binge eating, however, may follow because the individual is extremely hungry and having trouble controlling urges.  Unfortunately, purging frequently follows the binge eating session. By limiting your daily calorie intake, individuals may not be getting nutrients needed to function properly during every day activities. 

If you find yourself struggling with drunkorexia, here are some helpful tips: Martini

Moderation: Eat in moderation and you will not have to worry about limiting your calories in order to enjoy a drink or two.

Limits: Set limits on how much you will drink, and keep track of how many drinks you consume throughout an evening. (As a general rule for low-risk drinking, try to keep it to no more than three drinks in one sitting).

Choices: Choose drinks with a lower calorie content. Many mixed drinks are filled with sugar and loaded with calories.There are many options for low calorie beer.

Healthy Lifestyle: Eating healthy and exercising on a regular basis are the best ways to manage weight- you do not need to deprive yourself a meal!

Support: If you find yourself struggling ask family, friends, or seek professional help.  UND offers free counseling services to students.

UND offers many resources to students beyond the University Counseling Center.  These resources include: Student Health Services, Residence Services, University Police Department, Dean of Students (CARE team).  If you would like to find out more information about these services look under the alcohol tab on the Heath & Wellness Hub homepage (http://und.edu/health-wellness/hub/alcohol.cfm).

What do you do when you’re sick with the flu?

We all get sick from time to time. Sometime it is just a minor cold – which is expected when living in this frozen tundra. Sometimes, however, it is the flu (AKA influenza) – a respiratory illness caused by a virus. Flu is highly contagious and is usually spread by people coughing and sneezing around you. The virus then becomes airborne and can be inhaled by anyone nearby. You can also get the flu if you touch a contaminated surface like a phone or a doorknob and then touch your nose or mouth.

Adults are contagious one day before getting symptoms and up to 7 days after becoming ill which means that you can spread the flu virus not even knowing that you are infected. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), between 5% and 20% of Americans get the flu each year.

So how do you know it is flu? The most common symptoms of the flu are:

- Fever: 100-102°F lasting 3-4 days

- Headaches

- Muscle or body aches

- Fatigue/weakness lasting 2-3 weeks

- Extreme exhaustion at onset of virus

- Chest discomfort and cough, especially if it becomes severe

- Rare: vomiting or diarrhea

- Occasional symptoms might include stuffy nose, sneezing, and sore throat. However, these symptoms are more likely to be the common cold rather than flu.

Complications of the flu can be life threatening, such as bacterial pneumonia, ear infection, sinus infection, dehydration, or worsening of chronic medical conditions like congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized and 36,000 die annually because of flu in the United States, according to NIH.

To avoid these unpleasant symptoms and terrible complications that can prevent you from studying and having social life, there are a couple of things you can do to recover faster:

1. Blow your nose often and right away: gently blow while plugging the other nostril to avoid irritation.

2. Stay rested: sleeping and relaxing helps the body direct energy toward the immunity battle internally.

3. Gargle: moistens a sore throat and brings temporary relief, 1 tsp. of salt per cup of water 4 times per day.

4. Drink hot liquids: relieves nasal congestion and helps prevent dehydration, soothes inflamed membranes that line the nose and throat.

5. Take a steamy shower: moisturizes your nasal passages and relaxes you.

6. Apply hot/cold packs around congested sinuses: either temperature may help you feel more comfortable.

7. Sleep with an extra pillow under your head: helps drain nasal passages.

8. Don’t fly unless necessary: added air pressure puts more stress on your respiratory system.

9. Stay at home and rest 24 hours AFTER a fever has broken: prevent the spread of the flu!

The best way to prevent the flu is to get vaccinated early! Flu season usually starts in October and it takes about two weeks for the protective properties of the vaccine to take effect. By being vaccinated, you help your body to build antibodies to fight off the infection easier. To schedule your appointment, call Student Health at (701)777-4500.

Also, don’t forget to wash your hands, eat healthy, exercise, and clean your work space. It will greatly reduce your risk of getting the flu. Stay healthy and away from this virus!

National Nutrition Month

Coming to the end of February means that National Nutrition Month is just around the corner. Every March is National Nutrition Month and every year UND celebrates March with many nutrition related activities. This year UND is offering a recipe contest, Student Iron Chef, Lunch and Learn, food drive, grocery bingo, and a wellness screening.

NNM 14

The Delicious and Nutritious Recipe Contest will be going on the majority of the month. The recipe submission deadline is March 21; to find out details about this event click on the following link.

http://und.edu/health-wellness/wellness/nutrition/index.cfm

recipes

Student Iron Chef Contest Semi-final dates of the competition are March 3rd and March 4th. The final competition will take place on March 11th. Groups of students will be creating a dish consisting of Alaskan Salmon, YUM.

UND student iron chef

A food drive will take place for the whole month of March. Non-perishable food items and personal care products are appreciated. Donation boxes will be placed throughout the campus.

 food drive

Grocery Bingo will take place on March 28th at 9pm in the loading dock. It is free to all students and it’s a great way to win free groceries and meet students.

 grocery bingo

A lunch ‘N learn will be held on March 26th in Gamble Hall from 12:30pm to 1:30pm in room 225. This event is part of the Deans for wellness initiative; it is open to all staff, faculty, spouses and partners of the College of Business and Public Administration. You can RSVP to this email:

 laura.dvorak@und.edu

The wellness screening will be held at the EERC on March 5th. It is open to faculty, staff, partners and spouses. This is an appointment only event to make an appointment click the following link.

www.und.edu/workwell

The Body Project starts this week

The Body Project is back! Come join us for a 2-week body-acceptance workshop designed to help women resist sociocultural pressures to conform to the thin-ideal and reduce their pursuit of thinness. We will discuss the following topics: how body image ideal has been changing over time, how thin ideal was developed and why, who benefits from supporting thin idea, how to develop healthy body image, how to decrease binge eating and how to love your body more. There will be many thought-provoking discussions and experiential exercises.

Option 1: Wednesdays, February 26 & March 5th, 12-1:30 pm, Presidents Room.

Option 2: Thursdays, February 27th & March 6th, 12-1:30pm, Memorial Room.

Pre-registration is required. You can register by sending us an email at UND.hwhub@UND.edu or calling us at 701-777-2097.

Oh no! Not the Candy!

Many of you will be celebrating Valentine’s Day on February 14th with a significant other or maybe just a friend. Instead of going for the candy this Valentine’s Day, indulge your sweetheart with a heart healthy gift or date.

During this time of year stores are filled with red, pink, and heart shaped candies in all flavors and sizes. If you cannot resist eating candy this Valentine’s Day, here is a candy that outshines the others when it comes to nutritional value. Dark Chocolate with 65% cocoa has been shown to have heart-helping flavanols when ate in moderation. So if you are looking for a candy fix look for the dark chocolate.

healthy-hearts-valentines-day-recipe-photo-420-FF0208EFCA501

A few things to make this Valentine’s Day heart healthy include; cooking at home, getting a fruit basket, and portioning your treats.

Cooking at home is heart healthy because you can control the amount of food you eat. Another advantage is you can cut out sodium from recipes; swap spices for salt and avoid prepackaged seasonings. If cooking at home isn’t meant for you then remember to avoid fried foods, creamy sauces and gravies. Restaurants serve large portions; sharing an entree can control how much you eat.

Even though it is still winter you can bundle up and do something active such as sledding, ice skating, indoor Rockwall, or Northern Air. These are all great date ideas that get your heart racing. If you are sick of the cold like many of us are, checking out a local cooking class would be a great idea too. Culinary Corner in the Wellness center is offering DeLightful Desserts on Thursday February 13th from 8-9pm.

brownie

If you still don’t know what to do check out the sites below. They have lovely ideas to make sure your Valentine’s is sweet as can be.

http://spoonful.com/recipes/healthy-hearts

http://spoonful.com/valentines-day

http://www.familylife.com/articles/topics/holidays/featured/valentines-day/25-valentines-day-ideas-for-couples

References:

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/food-nutrition/healthy-eating/5-best-worst-valentines-day-candies-pictures.htm

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyDietGoals/Heart-Healthy-Valentines-Day-Tips_UCM_322023_Article.jsp

Get tested UND!

Free HIV Testing February 7th

Did you know that February 7th is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness day?

To help raise awareness of the day, UND Multicultural Center, Health & Wellness Hub, and Ten Percent Society are hosting a FREE HIV testing at the Loading Dock from 11am-2pm on February 7th, 2014.

All UND students, faculty, and staff are welcome to get tested for a virus that can show no symptoms for up to 10 years or more. No matter what race, gender, or sexual orientation you are, everyone can contract HIV/AIDS.  HIV is primarily spread through unprotected sex and intravenous drug use. This virus attacks the body’s immune system and can lead to AIDS, the late stage of HIV infection, when a person’s immune system is severely damaged and has difficulty fighting diseases and certain cancers.

Did you know that every year in the United States, the Center for Disease Control will identify 50,000 new cases of HIV? Within these new cases, 39% of them are young adults ranging from the ages of 13 to 29.  Getting tested is a great way to know your status and to keep yourself and others out of the statistics.

Along with the FREE HIV testing, there will also be FREE FOOD and a Q & A table for anyone who would like more information on HIV/AIDS to keep you busy while you are waiting for a quick 20 minute test result.

Bring a friend and get a FREE HIV test and FREE FOOD!  For more information on the event please click on the link below: http://und.edu/calendar/index.php/view/event/detail/25819/free-hiv-testing

Super Bowl Food Makeover

The Super Bowl is this Sunday February 2nd and many of us make it an excuse to eat a lot of snack food. The typical snack foods of the Super Bowl consists of; nachos, wings, chili, chips, dip, and much more. Here are some ways you can makeover these typical high calorie foods for this years Super Bowl.

When making chili or any other dish that calls for hamburger use lean ground turkey or lean ground sirloin. This substitution lowers the saturated fat content.
untitled

When making Nachos use pork tenderloin and bacon- studded beans. As for cheese you should use the fat-free kind. To make these nachos even more flavorful add salsa and chunks of avocado; this way you can skip the sour cream and cheese sauce.

13

When it comes to those tasty dips make sure you avoid the mayonnaise and cheese. Creamy dips that contain these ingredients usually have many hidden fats. A way to make a better dip for the Super Bowl is to puree white beans, onions, garlic, black beans, green chilies and parmesan cheese together. You can modify the dips to your liking too.

12

To see some great Super Bowl food makeovers check out the following sites.
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/low-fat-super-bowl-recipes-00400000063811/page6.html

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20338949,00.html

References:

http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/low-fat-super-bowl-recipes-00400000063811/page6.html

How to prevent the “Turkey gut”

turkey dinner

With Thanksgiving a little less than two weeks away I’m sure everyone has been thinking about all the delicious homemade foods they will be eating; I know I have.

Some things to remember on Thanksgiving to avoid the “turkey gut” are:

Don’t over indulge. This sounds like common sense but many people get caught up in the spirit of the holiday and the vast amounts of food that are set out in front of them. This doesn’t mean you can’t try everything that is set in front of you; it means to portion the foods you want to eat.

When portioning your plate remember the myplate visual guideline.

myplate plate

Don’t skip breakfast or lunch just because you are preparing to eat a large Thanksgiving meal. When you skip meals you starve your body.

Drink lots of water; many times people think they are hungry when infact they are actually thirsty.

Out of sight out of mind. After eating a Thanksgiving meal put away the food. When food is out of sight you are less likely to keep grazing on the food.

After your delicious Thanksgiving meal take a walk with all of your family and friends.

By following these tips it will help prevent the need to loosen the top button of your pants and prevent the “turkey gut”.

bloated

References:

http://www.livescience.com/10284-healthy-thanksgiving-5-tips-avoid-overindulging.html

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/10-tips-for-a-thinner-thanksgiving

WELL-O-WEEN

Now that Halloween has past, it has kicked off the fall and holiday season.  This is also known as Well-o-ween.  During well-o-ween we have to remember to stay healthy!

A few ways you can stay healthy during well-o-ween are listed below:

  • Maintain your exercise routine or start exercising.
  • Exercise can help beat the fall blues and it will keep your immune system strong.
  • Don’t forget to keep eating fruits and vegetables
    • With all the holidays and change in temperature sometimes we forget how important fruits and veggies really are.
    •  Kale, pumpkin, apples, sweet potatoes and pomegranates are a few things that are in season right now.
  • Flu seasonGet your flu shot; this will prevent you from being sick.
    • Get enough sleep and maintain stress
      • This helps fight off the flu.

 

citrus exercise live eat be healthy needle tea veggie

Resources: http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/8-fall-tips-healthy-living?page=3  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/roshini-raj-md/health-tips-for-fall_b_3896728.html

 

 

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