Category Archives: Faculty & Staff

KNOW How to Help

Many students think that partying ONLY leads to a great time. Unfortunately, sometimes people take it too far and drink way too much, which can lead to some serious issues. It is important for all of us to KNOW How to Help if a dangerous situation were to arise. Check out more information on the KNOW Campaign!

Here are some great tips for knowing how to help your buddies out when they drink.  One helpful acronym that we use to remember the signs of alcohol over dose is C.A.N.S. CANS

Now, sometimes students in North Dakota are afraid to seek medical attention for themselves or a friend if they have drank too much because they do not want to get in trouble with the law. Fortunately, North Dakota passed a law called the North Dakota Medical Amnesty Law. This law states that if you contact law enforcement or emergency services for yourself or someone else, who is underage because there is a need for medical assistance due to alcohol consumption, AND you wait for and cooperate with emergency responders, up to five people are immune from criminal prosecution in North Dakota. Although a person may not get in trouble with the law, they could get in trouble with the university if they are a student.

Last but not least, know that every minute matters. If someone needs medical attention due to alcohol overdose do not hesitate to get them help! Some important numbers to have in your phone include:

  • The ambulance, fire, and police (9-1-1)
  • The Care Team (day: 701-777-2664, night/weekend: 701-777-3491)
  • Campus Police (701-777-3491).

Keep these helpful tips in mind so that if you or a friend ever find yourself in a serious situation, you will KNOW How to Help.

Spring into Seasonal Fruit and Vegetables

It is hard to believe that spring is here (literally). With the start of a new season means different fruits and vegetables are in season as well. As far as fruits and vegetables go, spring is considered to be March, April and May. When a fruit or vegetable is in season it means is at its peak of flavor or harvest. Not only will the flavor be optimal the price will be the cheapest. Next time you head out to the grocery store be sure to try some of the following items that are in season right now!

strawberriessnow peasmango

Remember, you can enjoy the taste of any fruit or vegetable year-round by using fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and 100% juice – it all counts!

Apricots 
Artichokes 
Asparagus 
Barbados Cherries
Belgian Endive
Bitter Melon
Broccoli
Butter Lettuce
Cactus
Chayote Squash 
Cherimoya
Chives
Collard Greens
Corn
Fava Beans
Fennel
Fiddlehead Ferns
Green Beans
Honeydew
Jackfruit
Limes
Lychee 
Mango
Manoa Lettuce
Morel Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Oranges 
Pea Pods
Peas
Pineapple
Purple Asparagus
Radicchio
Ramps
Red Leaf Lettuce
Rhubarb 
Snow Peas
Sorrel
Spinach
Spring Baby Lettuce
Strawberries
Swiss Chard
Vidalia Onions
Watercress
White Asparagus
 
limesartichokeswiss chardpineapple

Reference: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.com

 

Kick the Butts’ Butt

On Wednesday, March 19th, anti-tobacco activists everywhere will be acknowledging the annual “Kick Butts Day.” Kick Butts Day is a day focused on standing up and speaking out against both tobacco use and the tobacco industry. All across the world, people will be holding all kinds of different anti-tobacco related events.  The primary goal of most of these events is to encourage current tobacco users to quit using tobacco for good. whatisincig

The benefits of quitting tobacco use are numerous, and it is important to investigate the options out there for helping you quit if you choose. Here at UND, there are plenty of resources. At the Health and Wellness Hub, located in the Memorial Union, users will find “Quit Kits” available.  Users can also check out Student Health Services to discuss the process of quitting tobacco, and perhaps get a check up to see how at risk you might be for tobacco induced health problems. Across North Dakota, the Department of Health has also established the “ND Quits” campaign.  Users interested in quitting can check out the campaign’s website or dial the toll free number to get access to free resources available for quitting.

The good news is that all across the U.S., tobacco use is decreasing. Compared to 42% of the population reporting regular tobacco use in 1965, in 2012, the percentage was reported to be 10%. (kickbuttsday.org) So, if you’re interested in quitting, please do your lungs a favor and check out these fabulous resources!

www.kickbuttsday.org (the official website for “Kick Butts Day”)

http://www.ndhealth.gov/ndquits/  (the official website for the ND Quits campaign)

1.800.784.8669 (ND Quits hotline)

701-777-2605 (UND Student Health Services)

National Nutrition Month

Coming to the end of February means that National Nutrition Month is just around the corner. Every March is National Nutrition Month and every year UND celebrates March with many nutrition related activities. This year UND is offering a recipe contest, Student Iron Chef, Lunch and Learn, food drive, grocery bingo, and a wellness screening.

NNM 14

The Delicious and Nutritious Recipe Contest will be going on the majority of the month. The recipe submission deadline is March 21; to find out details about this event click on the following link.

http://und.edu/health-wellness/wellness/nutrition/index.cfm

recipes

Student Iron Chef Contest Semi-final dates of the competition are March 3rd and March 4th. The final competition will take place on March 11th. Groups of students will be creating a dish consisting of Alaskan Salmon, YUM.

UND student iron chef

A food drive will take place for the whole month of March. Non-perishable food items and personal care products are appreciated. Donation boxes will be placed throughout the campus.

 food drive

Grocery Bingo will take place on March 28th at 9pm in the loading dock. It is free to all students and it’s a great way to win free groceries and meet students.

 grocery bingo

A lunch ‘N learn will be held on March 26th in Gamble Hall from 12:30pm to 1:30pm in room 225. This event is part of the Deans for wellness initiative; it is open to all staff, faculty, spouses and partners of the College of Business and Public Administration. You can RSVP to this email:

 laura.dvorak@und.edu

The wellness screening will be held at the EERC on March 5th. It is open to faculty, staff, partners and spouses. This is an appointment only event to make an appointment click the following link.

www.und.edu/workwell

The Body Project starts this week

The Body Project is back! Come join us for a 2-week body-acceptance workshop designed to help women resist sociocultural pressures to conform to the thin-ideal and reduce their pursuit of thinness. We will discuss the following topics: how body image ideal has been changing over time, how thin ideal was developed and why, who benefits from supporting thin idea, how to develop healthy body image, how to decrease binge eating and how to love your body more. There will be many thought-provoking discussions and experiential exercises.

Option 1: Wednesdays, February 26 & March 5th, 12-1:30 pm, Presidents Room.

Option 2: Thursdays, February 27th & March 6th, 12-1:30pm, Memorial Room.

Pre-registration is required. You can register by sending us an email at UND.hwhub@UND.edu or calling us at 701-777-2097.

Oh no! Not the Candy!

Many of you will be celebrating Valentine’s Day on February 14th with a significant other or maybe just a friend. Instead of going for the candy this Valentine’s Day, indulge your sweetheart with a heart healthy gift or date.

During this time of year stores are filled with red, pink, and heart shaped candies in all flavors and sizes. If you cannot resist eating candy this Valentine’s Day, here is a candy that outshines the others when it comes to nutritional value. Dark Chocolate with 65% cocoa has been shown to have heart-helping flavanols when ate in moderation. So if you are looking for a candy fix look for the dark chocolate.

healthy-hearts-valentines-day-recipe-photo-420-FF0208EFCA501

A few things to make this Valentine’s Day heart healthy include; cooking at home, getting a fruit basket, and portioning your treats.

Cooking at home is heart healthy because you can control the amount of food you eat. Another advantage is you can cut out sodium from recipes; swap spices for salt and avoid prepackaged seasonings. If cooking at home isn’t meant for you then remember to avoid fried foods, creamy sauces and gravies. Restaurants serve large portions; sharing an entree can control how much you eat.

Even though it is still winter you can bundle up and do something active such as sledding, ice skating, indoor Rockwall, or Northern Air. These are all great date ideas that get your heart racing. If you are sick of the cold like many of us are, checking out a local cooking class would be a great idea too. Culinary Corner in the Wellness center is offering DeLightful Desserts on Thursday February 13th from 8-9pm.

brownie

If you still don’t know what to do check out the sites below. They have lovely ideas to make sure your Valentine’s is sweet as can be.

http://spoonful.com/recipes/healthy-hearts

http://spoonful.com/valentines-day

http://www.familylife.com/articles/topics/holidays/featured/valentines-day/25-valentines-day-ideas-for-couples

References:

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/food-nutrition/healthy-eating/5-best-worst-valentines-day-candies-pictures.htm

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyDietGoals/Heart-Healthy-Valentines-Day-Tips_UCM_322023_Article.jsp

Get tested UND!

Free HIV Testing February 7th

Did you know that February 7th is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness day?

To help raise awareness of the day, UND Multicultural Center, Health & Wellness Hub, and Ten Percent Society are hosting a FREE HIV testing at the Loading Dock from 11am-2pm on February 7th, 2014.

All UND students, faculty, and staff are welcome to get tested for a virus that can show no symptoms for up to 10 years or more. No matter what race, gender, or sexual orientation you are, everyone can contract HIV/AIDS.  HIV is primarily spread through unprotected sex and intravenous drug use. This virus attacks the body’s immune system and can lead to AIDS, the late stage of HIV infection, when a person’s immune system is severely damaged and has difficulty fighting diseases and certain cancers.

Did you know that every year in the United States, the Center for Disease Control will identify 50,000 new cases of HIV? Within these new cases, 39% of them are young adults ranging from the ages of 13 to 29.  Getting tested is a great way to know your status and to keep yourself and others out of the statistics.

Along with the FREE HIV testing, there will also be FREE FOOD and a Q & A table for anyone who would like more information on HIV/AIDS to keep you busy while you are waiting for a quick 20 minute test result.

Bring a friend and get a FREE HIV test and FREE FOOD!  For more information on the event please click on the link below: http://und.edu/calendar/index.php/view/event/detail/25819/free-hiv-testing

Super Bowl Food Makeover

The Super Bowl is this Sunday February 2nd and many of us make it an excuse to eat a lot of snack food. The typical snack foods of the Super Bowl consists of; nachos, wings, chili, chips, dip, and much more. Here are some ways you can makeover these typical high calorie foods for this years Super Bowl.

When making chili or any other dish that calls for hamburger use lean ground turkey or lean ground sirloin. This substitution lowers the saturated fat content.
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When making Nachos use pork tenderloin and bacon- studded beans. As for cheese you should use the fat-free kind. To make these nachos even more flavorful add salsa and chunks of avocado; this way you can skip the sour cream and cheese sauce.

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When it comes to those tasty dips make sure you avoid the mayonnaise and cheese. Creamy dips that contain these ingredients usually have many hidden fats. A way to make a better dip for the Super Bowl is to puree white beans, onions, garlic, black beans, green chilies and parmesan cheese together. You can modify the dips to your liking too.

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To see some great Super Bowl food makeovers check out the following sites.
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/low-fat-super-bowl-recipes-00400000063811/page6.html

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20338949,00.html

References:

http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/low-fat-super-bowl-recipes-00400000063811/page6.html

A workout playlist that’s PROVEN to get results? – Yes please!

If you’re already struggling with your New Year plans to get fit, it may be because you’re listening to the wrong kind of music during your workout.

Sports psychologists from London have discovered that specific genres of music are best suited to specific types of exercise, and listening to the wrong kind of track could hinder your performance. 

They found that rap music provides the best beats per minute for stretching and running, while dance music is more suited to strength training.

Pop music is best used during warm up and cool down, but rock music should be avoided during exercise due to frequent changes in tempo that can affect your rhythm.

The research was carried out by sports psychologist Dr Costas Karageorghis, the Music in Exercise and Sport Group at Brunel University in London and Spotify.

The team analysed 6.7 million Spotify playlists containing the word ‘workout’ in the title and compared the different beats per minute (bpm) to those used in certain workouts.

For example, a person’s typical stride rate while jogging or running is 150 to 190 strides per minute.

If these figures are halved it gives a range of 75 to 95 bpm – the beat range found most commonly in urban music, particularly rap.

Many of the lyrics in rap music also ‘imbue the physical energy’ best suited to running, explained the researchers.

Whereas pop is perfect for slower, more repetitive-type tasks, including aerobic warm up and cool down because many pop songs ‘have regular rhythmic patterns and beats.’

Dance music is best suited to strength and weight training because its ‘fast, rhythmical, bass psyches people up before weight training sessions.

Elsewhere, Dr Karageorghis said that for maximum effect, people should use songs that remind them of their adolescence and early adulthood to make them feel youthful and fit.

He said: ‘A suitably motivational playlist can help to ‘colour’ the symptoms of exercise-related fatigue, like breathlessness and a beating heart, in such a way that they are interpreted in a more positive manner.

‘This means that at the point when your body is shouting stop, the music has the power to lift your mood and beckon you on.’

Celebrity trainer Joey Gonzalez added: ‘During workouts, an hour-long mix of strength training and treadmill-based cardio intervals, we try to match our runs and exercises to the beat of our music.

‘For example, timing the treadmill sprints to the chorus of a track with a great hook, or playing a slower song with bass for incline jogs, and even matching steady consistent beats for long endurance runs are all part of our strategy.’

Whereas rock music should be avoid during cardio and high-intensity workouts because the different changes in tempo can affect a person’s rhythm.

Based on the findings, the researchers have compiled a playlist with song suggestions for cool down, aerobic warm up, varying levels of cardio intensity, strength training and cool down. Music Playlist

Information taken from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2538601/The-workout-playlist-thats-PROVEN-work-Scientists-analyse-beats-songs-reveal-perfect-exercise-tracks.html

Calcium

Maintain strong bones, carry out many important functions. Stored in bones, where it supports their structure and hardness. Needed for muscle movement and to send messages between the brain and body parts by way of your nerves. Helps blood vessels move blood throughout the body, and release hormones and enzymes that effect functions in the body.

Milk, yogurt, cheese, kale, broccoli, sardines, salmon, grains (breads, pasta, unfortified cereals), often added to fruit juices, soy and rice beverages and tofu

RDA 1,000mg/day

http://ods.od.nih.gov/

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